Why So Negative?

Banish NegativityThe world is full of challenges. So is your company and your job. The news is laden with ten negative stories to every one positive story.

One of my favorite affirmation from Huffington Post’s 35 life-changing affirmations is:

I am superior to negative thoughts

Read all 35 affirmations here.

Entertaining the negativity only fuels gloomy and despair.

Positivity can also spread like wildfire – if someone just creates that first spark though.

So TODAY, let’s go be:

  • Awesome
  • Fun-loving
  • Happy
  • Productive
  • Compassionate
  • Understanding
  • Forgiving

Lukas Graham says it best in his song 7 Years

I only see my goals, I don’t believe in failure
‘Cause I know the smallest voices, they can make it major

Have a good, great, terrific, outstanding, and amazing day!

-DJ

What Lies Beyond

SP trafficMy heart was racing, every pulse thumping through my entire body. Muscles in my arms, shoulders and legs all sore from the tension. Fingers stiff, white-knuckled from my death grip on the steering wheel. Another turn ahead, I crank the wheel to make the sharp turn, tires screeching, accelerating through the turn to keep ahead of the cars battling me for position. A near collision; brake, down shift, avoid being hit. Then shift again, accelerate, continue soaring down the stretch of asphalt. Head is throbbing, headache increasing with each kilometer of ground I cover. Almost there, the finish is in sight; one last swerve to avoid another car, then hard right and finally… stopped. Whew! I did it. I survived. No, not a Formula-One or Indy race, but an adrenaline fueled drive through the streets of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

For someone who grew up driving in the shadows of the Rocky Mountains, this type of traffic is unheard of. Yes I’ve driven in large metropolitan cities like L.A. and Atlanta and have experienced grid-lock and traffic jams. However, this is Brazil. The narrow windy cobblestone roads wreak havoc on both car and driver. It’s not stalled traffic; it’s hectic, chaotic movement. Nerve-racking aggressive driving that feels more like a fight for survival than a mere commute. The multitude of three-lane roundabouts becomes five or six mingled lanes based on the time of day and numbers of cars that wedge themselves onto the road. Buses have the right-of-way because they’re bigger and will run you off the road if you don’t yield. Stop signs lining the streets are irrelevant. Red traffic lights are observed and obeyed, well at least until dark, then slow down long enough to flash your brights, honk and accelerate as to not get robbed when stopping, all while hoping you don’t get t-boned from a crossing vehicle. The people of Rio de Janeiro, the Cariocas, have become accustomed to this feverish traffic and slender, congested streets that snake through concrete edifices.

So why subject yourself to this? When driving it’s difficult to see anything but the cars, taxis and buses, and the looming shadows cast by the adjacent buildings. These objects distract your attention and block your view from seeing the beauty of this city and surrounding landscapes. It’s the proverbial problem of not seeing the forest through the trees.

The secret is to get out or get above it all. Rio II 20140806_150428

Turning onto Avenida Atlântica the buildings dissipate in the background and spectacular views of the iconic Copacabana Beach are seen. Continuing down this large avenue and eventually turning onto Avenida Vieira Souto the beaches of Ipanema and Leblon come into view. Miles and miles of white sand, palm trees and deep blue waters stretch as far as the eye can see.

As if the majestic beauty of the beaches wasn’t enough the lush green mountainside of Sugarloaf, Pão de Açucar, lines the north-east skyline. While north of the Copacabana boardwalk and neighboring beaches, Corcovado rises over 2,300 feet above sea level. The landmark peaks sits amidst the Tijuca forest, elevating the 125 foot Cristo Redentor, Christ the Redeemer, statue which overlooks Brazil most renowned city.

PaoDeAcucar II 20140805_140253The top peaks of Sugarloaf can be reached by cable car, the Corcovado by its designated train or tour vans. Views from the high vantage points are breathtaking!

The life of Rio’s 6.3 Million inhabitants is challenging. The people work hard while facing innumerable economic and political challenges in South America’s largest country.

There is a lesson to be learned from these Cariocas. They understand it’s not about daily grind, the congestion, and the turmoil life throws at you. It’s about the magnificence, the beauty and joy that can be found when you look up and look past what’s right in front of you.

Super Perspective

Ice Cave IIIt was cold and damp. No vibrant colors to brighten the rooms just a dull wash of white and gray. It was massive and spacious and utterly empty. No family or friends to be found; located thousands of miles away from any sign of civilization. An eerie complete and utter silence prevailed. Although not a captive, he was absolutely alone in this, his cave of isolation.

But… he called it A Fortress of Solitude! His glorious, magnificent structure. Brilliant. Rejuvenating. Inspiring.

And as young children we wished we could fly, high and far to our own similar fortress.

A powerful example of super strength and power, and perspective.

True Man of Steel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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